The annual Musicians Food Bank Benefit returns for its 11th year on December 18.

Musicians break out the tunes for food bank

Local artists will once again pass the hat at Lakeside Pub during the annual Lakeside Musicians Food Bank Benefit on December 18.

About a dozen local artists will once again pass the hat at Lakeside Pub during the annual Lakeside Musicians Food Bank Benefit on December 18.

Now in its 11th year, the evening of music has raised as much as $2,500 for the Columbia Valley Food Bank, with $1,100 going to the organization last year. Donations of non-perishable food items are also accepted at the pub.

Guido Hocchriden, who owns the Lakeside Pub with his wife Helga, says the event typically draws a good crowd of local music lovers and artists.

“The last couple years it was slowing down slightly, but that’s probably because of the economy and HST and stuff like that,” he says. “But usually we have pretty good turnouts. We usually have music non-stop from 5 to 10 p.m. or later. It depends on the amount of artists we have.”

Hocchriden says supporting the food bank at this time of year just makes sense.

“They are always in need of money or food,” he says.

“Just before Christmas it’s always nice to get yourself into the spirit and open your wallets a little bit and help some other people.”

Fellow organizer Bill Cropper, who will contribute tunes of his own to this year’s benefit, says the lineup so far includes artists such as Kurt Reichel, Deb Ede, Larry Newman, Bernie Evans, Brian Rogers, Pat Hess, Franz Grafinger, Pat and Lisa O’Sullivan, Bruce Childs, Mike Smith, Fraser Smith and Bud and Stacey Decosse. Dave McGrath will take over emceeing duties.

“There’ll be tons of musicians,” he says. “It’s a great night.”

The night’s music typically starts around 5 p.m., and after each artist’s set, a hat is passed around to take donations.

Cropper says regular attendees typically bring their donations in small bills, allowing them to contribute after each performance.

“I would say it’s like a family, almost,” Hocchriden says of the event’s atmosphere.

“All the artists they know each other, and pretty much the audience they know each other and the artists. It’s almost a big, big family. And everybody’s having a good time.”

 

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