Shuswap get $40k for clean energy review

The Shuswap Indian Band near Invermere will receive a $40,000 grant as part of the First Nations Clean Energy Business Fund.

The Shuswap Indian Band near Invermere will receive a $40,000 grant as part of the First Nations Clean Energy Business Fund (FNCEBF).

The FNCEBF was announced as part of the Clean Energy Act of 2010, and provides opportunities for First Nations’ participation in the clean energy and clean technology sectors.

Funded initially by a government contribution of $5 million, over time the fund is expected to receive additional revenue from new eligible power projects based on a percentage of land and water rentals, according to the Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation.

The $40,000 is expected to be used to perform technical and financial reviews and summaries to assess the Beaver River Hydro Complex project (which is part of the Columbia Valley Transmission Project), and “assess the opportunity of developing a joint venture leading to the design, construction and operation of a project in partnership with the current project proponent.”

As part of the FNCEBF, 13 other Aboriginal communities will also be receiving grants of either $30,000 or $40,000 to help the communities in question study how they currently use energy at look at possible energy alternatives for the future.

Communities are required to submit a proposal to the Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation, and proposals are judged on a case-by-case basis.

“I’m very happy to see so many new applicants coming forward with projects,” Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Mary Polak said in a release.

“Regardless of their size, this funding provides real opportunities for First Nations to pursue their alternative energy plans bringing real economic and social benefits to their communities.”

For more information on the FNCEBF, visit www.gov.bc.ca/arr/economic/fncebf.html.

 

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