Black Press launches branded content for local business

This new format is known as "native advertising."



Black Press has announced the launch of paid content for advertisers — the largest native advertising platform in B.C.

Regular visitors to Black Press websites and Facebook pages across B.C. might notice an additional source of information being made available to them.

Impress Branded Content has been added to introduce readers to some of the key businesses and individuals in their communities, while giving advertisers an additional way to provide information to consumers in a technology-driven era.

This format is known as “native advertising” and involves advertisers purchasing an “article” on the newsfeeds of Black Press websites.

An informational piece pertaining to their business appears on the newsfeed for seven days and resides under the “Impress” channel on the website for 12 months.

A link to the information is also added to the newspaper’s Facebook page and is clearly marked as “sponsored content,” so that readers know it is not a news story.

Andrew Franklin, Director of Digital Development for Black Press, says no more than two paid content stories will appear on any of the Black Press websites or Facebook pages each week. Some weeks, there won’t be any.

Advertisers have the option of paying to have a managed Facebook “boost” to reach a targeted audience – for example, young women living in Cranbrook interested in bridal wear.

Black Press has started this initiative as a business move providing multimedia solutions for advertisers, Franklin said.

“We need to look at ways to diversify our business into the future, and both online and print are important to us. We need to find ways to grow our business through opportunities online.”

All articles posted as Impress Branded Content will be “editor approved,” Franklin added, with the idea that they are providing useful information – for example, a car dealership providing tips for buying a new vehicle or a dental office offering suggestions for keeping your teeth and gums healthy. The key to native advertising is transparency. Paid content will always be clearly labelled.

Recent paid content postings, during a pilot period, resulted in high online interest, generating great feedback to advertisers.

Franklin said the paid branded content will translate into powerful storytelling for advertisers across multiple platforms, including desktop computers, smart phones and tablets.

For further information, email impress@blackpress.ca.

Just Posted

The end of an Echo

Invermere Valley Echo shuts down operations in Columbia Valley

Creating a new narrative for Canal Flats

Economic development consultant hired, lists vision for next 90 days

UPDATE: Crews battle as wildfires rage in B.C. Interior

Crews brace for another day on B.C. firelines as no let up is likely

VIDEO: B.C. wildfires by the numbers

Wildfires continue to engulf regions of B.C.’s forests and communities.

VIDEO: More than 180 wildfires burning across B.C.

Firefighters from other provinces called in to assist

DTSS Grad March 2017

DTSS Grad March 2017

59 cats seized in Chase

59 neglected and injured cats were seized from a property in Chase

Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell dead at age 52

The singer/songwriter passed away early Thursday morning in Detroit

Paying tribute to a primeval passage

Uninterrupted celebrates the Adams River sockeye run in an extraordinary way.

UPDATE: Pemberton Music Festival cancelled, no automatic refunds

In the past, the music festival located in Pemberton drew large crowds last year of 180,000 fans

Medical wait times cost B.C. patients $2,300 each

New Fraser Institute report places B.C. at second worst in costs associated with long wait times

UPDATE: 22 killed at Ariana Grande concert

Witnesses reported hearing two loud bangs coming from near the arena’s bars at about 10:35 p.m.

One in three Canadian high school students have rode with drinking drivers, study reveals

Nearly one in five rode with a driver who’d been smoking pot

Top court to hear federal government’s appeal on residential school records

A lower court judge ruled to destroy the stories after 15 years unless consent is given to preserve

Most Read