Editorial: The U.S election, sleezy redefined

From a racist politician to a candidate mired in an email scandal, this American election has turned sour in the worst way imaginable.

Here we are, just over a week away from the outcome of the reality show that’s cloaked as a U.S. presidential election and Hillary Clinton is once again back in the hot seat for her private email server during her time as Secretary of State. This time it’s about emails that “could” be linked to Clinton’s email server investigation found on the computer that belonged to the estranged husband of one of Clinton’s closest advisors, a congressman who disgraced himself with a second sexting (texting sexually explicit messages) scandal while running for New York mayor in 2013. The first was in 2011 and the most recent was this year. Clinton’s advisor finally left her husband earlier this year, but now his emails have surfaced as an early Christmas present to Donald Trump who is taking full advantage of opportunity to resuscitate his campaign in the wake of his own sexual assault comments that led to a dozen women coming forward with accusations of his own past sexual misconduct.

Forget reality show. This reads more like the kind of sordid novel you’d be ashamed to be caught reading on a public bus.

How did it come to this? The Republicans put forward a living caricature as their candidate, a radical politician who wants to declare war on Muslims, erect a Cold War-era wall and use nuclear weapons, to name just a few of the terrifying goals Trump has outlined throughout his violence-inciting campaign. The Democrats nobly put forward a woman for president for the first time, but unlike the first black president who had a record so clean the only dirt his opponents could dig up was the purely fictitious claim that he wasn’t born in the U.S., Clinton can’t seem to keep her reputation intact. But comparing Clinton to Trump and his appalling rhetoric not to mention his business modus operandi totally devoid of ethics is like comparing apples to oranges. However, with another sex scandal reminiscent of the Bill Clinton presidency swirling around her in the final days before November 8th, it will be Americans’ alarm around Trump that propels her to victory should she win. And let’s hope she does.

Just Posted

The end of an Echo
The end of an Echo

Invermere Valley Echo shuts down operations in Columbia Valley

Creating a new narrative for Canal Flats

Economic development consultant hired, lists vision for next 90 days

Princeton wildfire phots courtesy of Debbie Lyon.
UPDATE: Crews battle as wildfires rage in B.C. Interior

Crews brace for another day on B.C. firelines as no let up is likely

VIDEO: B.C. wildfires by the numbers
VIDEO: B.C. wildfires by the numbers

Wildfires continue to engulf regions of B.C.’s forests and communities.

Aerial view south of Williams Lake Friday afternoon shows dry lightning storm passing over, leaving fire starts behind. Lightning sparked more than 100 new fires Friday. (Black Press)
VIDEO: More than 180 wildfires burning across B.C.

Firefighters from other provinces called in to assist

DTSS Grad March 2017
DTSS Grad March 2017

DTSS Grad March 2017

59 cats seized in Chase
59 cats seized in Chase

59 neglected and injured cats were seized from a property in Chase

(Flickr/Andreas Eldh)
Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell dead at age 52

The singer/songwriter passed away early Thursday morning in Detroit

Paying tribute to a primeval passage
Paying tribute to a primeval passage

Uninterrupted celebrates the Adams River sockeye run in an extraordinary way.

UPDATE: Pemberton Music Festival cancelled, no automatic refunds
UPDATE: Pemberton Music Festival cancelled, no automatic refunds

In the past, the music festival located in Pemberton drew large crowds last year of 180,000 fans

Photo by: WeissPaarz.com
Medical wait times cost B.C. patients $2,300 each

New Fraser Institute report places B.C. at second worst in costs associated with long wait times

UPDATE: 22 killed at Ariana Grande concert
UPDATE: 22 killed at Ariana Grande concert

Witnesses reported hearing two loud bangs coming from near the arena’s bars at about 10:35 p.m.

A university study finds that about nine per cent of Canada’s Grade 11 and 12 students – roughly 66,000 teens – have driven within an hour of drinking and 9.4 per cent drove after using marijuana.                                 Photo: Now-
Leader file
One in three Canadian high school students have rode with drinking drivers, study reveals

Nearly one in five rode with a driver who’d been smoking pot

Top court to hear federal government’s appeal on residential school records
Top court to hear federal government’s appeal on residential school records

A lower court judge ruled to destroy the stories after 15 years unless consent is given to preserve

Most Read